Hawaiian Prophecies - Na Kupuna Na’auao

Perpetuation & Preservation of Ancestral Knowledge & Practices

Hōkūleʻa ~ voyaging canoe

Hōkūleʻa[1] is a performance-accurate full-scale replica of a waʻa kaulua,[2][3] a Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe.[4][5] This is a Wikipedia excerpt.  Launched on 8 March 1975[6] by thePolynesian Voyaging Society, she is best known for her 1976 Hawaiʻi to Tahiti voyage performed with Polynesian navigation techniques,[7] without modern navigational instruments.[8] The primary goal of the voyage was to further support the anthropological theory of the Asiatic origin of native Oceanic people (Oceania maps:detail,region), of Polynesians and Hawaiians in particular, as the result of purposeful trips through the Pacific, as opposed to passive drifting on currents, or sailing from theAmericas.[9][10] (Scientific results of 2008, from DNA analysis, illuminate this theory of Polynesian settlement.)[11] A secondary goal of the project was to have the canoe and voyage “serve as vehicles for the cultural revitalization of Hawaiians and other Polynesians.” (Finney, Voyage of Rediscovery, p. 71)[12]

Since the 1976 voyage to Tahiti and back, Hōkūle‘a has completed nine more voyages to destinations in Micronesia, Polynesia, Japan, Canada, and the United States, all using ancient wayfinding techniques of celestial navigation. Her last completed voyage began 19 January 2007, when Hōkūle‘a left Hawaiʻi with the voyaging canoe Alingano Maisu on a voyage through Micronesia (map) and ports in southern Japan.[a] The voyage was expected to take five months. On 9 June 2007,[13]Hōkūle‘a completed the “One Ocean, One People” voyage to Yokohama, Japan. On April 5, 2009,[14] Hōkūle‘a returned to Honolulu following a roundtrip training sail toPalmyra Atoll,[15][16] undertaken to develop skills of potential crewmembers for Hōkūle‘a’s eventual circumnavigation, currently planned to commence in 2012.[17]

When not on a voyage, Hōkūle‘a is moored at the Marine Education Training Center (METC) of Honolulu Community College in Honolulu Harbor.

Hōkūleʻa[1] is a performance-accurate full-scale replica of a waʻa kaulua,[2][3] a Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe.[4][5] This is a Wikipedia excerpt.  Launched on 8 March 1975[6] by thePolynesian Voyaging Society, she is best known for her 1976 Hawaiʻi to Tahiti voyage performed with Polynesian navigation techniques,[7] without modern navigational instruments.[8] The primary goal of the voyage was to further support the anthropological theory of the Asiatic origin of native Oceanic people (Oceania maps:detail,region), of Polynesians and Hawaiians in particular, as the result of purposeful trips through the Pacific, as opposed to passive drifting on currents, or sailing from theAmericas.[9][10] (Scientific results of 2008, from DNA analysis, illuminate this theory of Polynesian settlement.)[11] A secondary goal of the project was to have the canoe and voyage “serve as vehicles for the cultural revitalization of Hawaiians and other Polynesians.” (Finney, Voyage of Rediscovery, p. 71)[12]
Since the 1976 voyage to Tahiti and back, Hōkūle‘a has completed nine more voyages to destinations in Micronesia, Polynesia, Japan, Canada, and the United States, all using ancient wayfinding techniques of celestial navigation. Her last completed voyage began 19 January 2007, when Hōkūle‘a left Hawaiʻi with the voyaging canoe Alingano Maisu on a voyage through Micronesia (map) and ports in southern Japan.[a] The voyage was expected to take five months. On 9 June 2007,[13]Hōkūle‘a completed the “One Ocean, One People” voyage to Yokohama, Japan. On April 5, 2009,[14] Hōkūle‘a returned to Honolulu following a roundtrip training sail toPalmyra Atoll,[15][16] undertaken to develop skills of potential crewmembers for Hōkūle‘a’s eventual circumnavigation, currently planned to commence in 2012.[17]
When not on a voyage, Hōkūle‘a is moored at the Marine Education Training Center (METC) of Honolulu Community College in Honolulu Harbor.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokulea

Posted in 5. Projects & Foundations.

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